Android is the major operation system for mobile devices in these days, but not everyone has the best understanding how to use this world most advanced mobile system for daily life, that’s why this website comes for – to provide the best useful tips and help to people to get a high efficient mobile experience and introduce the amazing new apps to people who really need. Android is a mobile OS or operating system. Technically speaking, it’s a software stack, one of whose components is an operating system, but let’s ignore that for the sake of argument. Essentially, it’s the piece of software that runs the show, much like iOS is for the iPhone and Windows is for the majority of laptops out there. For the latter examples, they’re owned and maintained by Apple and Microsoft respectively but in Android’s case – although not to the same extent – it’s all about Google.

As part of the Google licensing, just about all Android phones come complete with four buttons (home, menu, back and search) and multitouch capactive screens for all your pinching and zooming as made famous by the iPhone.

That said, one of the tricky things about the Android experience is that it’s far from uniform from device to device. Rather than become slave to someone else’s software, what many of the hardware manufacturers like to do is put their own custom user interface on top of the basic Android look. Sometimes that’s a good thing and sometimes it’s more of a hindrance than anything else, but if you’d rather avoid the custom UI altogether then the word to look out for in the smartphone field is “Nexus”. The Nexus One and Nexus S phones offer the pure, unadulterated Android experience.

Either way, a custom UI will not keep you from the some of the best features of the system which include tethering over both Wi-Fi and USB, meaning that you can pick up the Internet on your laptop so long as you have your Android phone with you, and the fact that you can use voice entry for every single field anywhere on the phone.

Like all good smartphones these days, the Android system does allow you to download third party apps. So whether that’s Angry Birds or Bump, you’ll find just about everything on the 200,000-strong Android Market.

While there are a handful of omissions – no Hipstamatic, for example – there are also a good glut of Android-only apps such as Google Gesture Search, which allows you to flick through your phone’s contents by drawing on the screen, and Listen, Google’s podcast service. In fairness, apps tend to come to iPhone first but you’ll certainly find what you’re looking for, or at least a version of it.

Much like iOS, it’s not just phones where you’ll find Android. There’s also media players out there that use it as their OS as well as, more recently, tablets too. HTC, Samsung and LG, Sony Ericsson and Motorola, to a lesser extent, are some of the major players manufacturing Android devices and you can expect almost all of them out there to carry all the gyros, accelerometers, magnetometers, proximity sensors, light sensors, pressure sensors, GPS and everything else you’d expect to find on a top end piece of kit.

Currently, the latest Android OS version is 4.1.2 Jelly Bean.

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